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is coming down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard mitt romney with a
for it. -- to work for it. [applause] we should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
sciences, and technology. >> off to the world of fashion now, which this we can be found not on the catwalks of milan, paris, or new york, but in south africa. >> that is right. african as well as international labels are showcasing the latest designs at the fashion week in johannesburg. >> african fashion has lately swung into the international spotlight with design is replacing bold colors and patterns with more contemporary designs. >> modern and confident -- the latest in south african fashion. the show was the hit of the festival. her cutting its creations have wowed critics. >> the techniques that i use, they make you feel -- like this one is not like what we know or what our people know. >> she is not the only hit designer here. african fashion has never been more popular. designers from ghana, morocco, and 10 other african countries have been showing off their creations in johannesburg. behind the scenes, for has been flying. african fashion is plugged into international trends. >> i am very excited because are looking and also the ladies, so i am hopingrything es
are on hold and spaying and neutering are being held. the baltimore humane society is also in need of science diet dog and cat food and nonclumping cat litter. >> i understand bge is on the scene. >>> thousands of people stood in line to take advantage of early voting. a look at how the storm affected it. >>> we've all heard the halloween warnings about tainted candy or flammable costumes. we're working with you on some halloween tips. >>> don't forget about our abc2 news app. you can check out the chill as it comes into our state. we'll show you some high resolution video. that's straight ahead. >>> sandy caused a virtual shut down on the east coast and that includes early voting. >> waiting time was up to an hour and a half. >>> many of people planned to vote early, but sandy changed their plans. >> because of the hurricane, i was not able to make it here, so we came today. >> early voting was set to end on thursday night but because of sandy you can now vote early until 9:00. >> millers island has seen their share of storm damage. sandy brought plenty of wind and rain but the homes are sta
in these terms and thought of economics as a moral science. and that you needed to ask always the question enough for what, what is money for? otherwise you are adrift. you just go on accumulating without end, without purpose. so he said enough for a good life. and he thought that technology was bringing that about. that it was actually producing such increases in weths th s ise would be able to have abundance with a fraction of the work. that people would then do. but that bit of it hasn't come about. >> why? >> i think a number of explanations. one is that our society's become much more unequal than it was when canes was writing. the other is i think he underestimated the force of insatiablity. the relative character -- >> you end up with new needs and new wants. if you have one car, you feel like maybe it will be even more fun to have three. in the book it seems to me -- correct me if i'm wrong -- briefly what you're saying is you need a good what we would consider good or upper middle-class in terms of material comforts, house, things like that. beyond that, the kind of constant accumulation
by the audience, of faculty members, and political science department, as well as the byu law school. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. hall will have the first question of the debate. for subsequent questions, we will alternates. each candidate will have a minute to as a question and both will have an additional 30 seconds for a bottle. if i determine that a follow-up question is aboard -- is appropriate, each will have a follow-up question. the first is from joseph, a student at purdum non-. -- at byu. >> what responsibilities are the state and local government and what responsibilities, if any, are the federal government? >> i served on the board of directors for sutter health care, so the largest not-for- profit health-careization in california we have known for a long time that we've had to have affordable quality health care. it is all our responsibility. under the affordable care act, we are first beginning to do what we need to do to reform health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i would like to put my children back on to health care until they're 26. i al
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. are you one of them? drink dream water, the natural, fast acting sleep aid that helps you wake refreshed. visit drinkdreamwater.com. >>> there is no electricity. people are living in shacks. growing up here makes you feel like you don't have control over your life. many children drop out of school, because they don't have school uniforms and textbooks. i realized that the only way that this area could change is through education. i'm tulani montondo. i'm helping children so we can change the community together. we help the children by paying for school books, school uniforms. our main focus is a tutoring program we run four days a week. as young people who were born and raised here, we know the challenges of the community. we come together for fun and come together for academics. >> it gives me a chance to go to the university. they are trying to pay for my fees. i also come back and help out here. a little can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not
the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, science and research, and, guess what, plenty of folks who were running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy, that it would kill jobs, and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out their math was just as bad back then as it is today. because by the end of bill clinton's second term, america had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up and property was down, and our deficit became the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin, we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. in the eight years after bill clinton left office, his policies were reversed. americans got tax cuts they didn't need. companies got tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas. oil companies and wall street were given free license to do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. the result of this top-down economics was falling income, record deficit, the slowest
, science, research. and guess what? plenty of folks running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy. that it would kill jobs. and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out, their math was just as bad back then as it is today because, by the end of bill clin totoclinton's turn am created 23 million jobs. the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. because in the eight years after bill clinton left office his policies were reversed. the wealthiest americans got tax cuts they didn't need, and that we couldn't afford. companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas, insurance companies, oil companies, wall street given free license do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. and result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, smallest job growth in a half century and economic crisis that we've been cleaning up for the last four y
to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child to. -- own a home, not rent. have a decent school to send your child to. helps send them to college. help your parents when they get older. that is why we are creating new manufacturing jobs, ted double exports. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. trained to million people over the next three years at community colleges. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump a
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
systems to integrate social media and data visualization tools with social science, analysis. his writing has appeared in the asian "wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organizations around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here in gaston hall, dr. kim. [applause] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of co
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
bionic leg this week in a demonstration of strength and science. >> jack built a house? >> reporter: when zac vawter heads out for a walk with his family, his amputated leg is no big deal. >> i'm not sure they remember dad with a normal leg, so it's just the way it is. >> reporter: but what he wants to do now, with a different leg, is a very big deal. it could help in changing the lives of thousands of amputees who have lost a leg. it involves this experimental leg, that like the real thing, obeys signals from his brain. but his story starts with a 2009 motorcycle accident that cost him his leg from the knee down. vawter knew about experimental surgeries so he persuaded neurosurgeons to save nerves from the amputated leg and attach them above the knee. he reached out to dr. levi hargrove at the center for bionic medicine. he wanted a chance at this leg. >> we have electrodes or sensors, antennas o his muscles. he thinks about bending his knee or benning his ankle. we decode those signals and send a command to the center. >> reporter: the $8 million is funned by the military, anxious to fi
. that is why we commit to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child wito. rent. a home, not have a decent school to send your child to. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump and 12 million gallons -- barrels of oil over that time. the will level the playing field for the middle-class. because whenever the middle class is given a chance, they have never ever let their country d
to cut college tuition in half over the next decade. we committed to hire hundreds of science and math teachers over the next years. when we talk about the job, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on, own a home, not rent, have a decent school to send your child to come and be able to help send them to college, take care of your parents when they get older and save enough money that your children will not have to take care of you. that is why we are going to create new manufacturing jobs, change the tax code, reward companies that come home not those that go abroad. two million people, two million americans with the skills they need over the next three years at community colleges, working with businesses to ensure that when people finish school they can go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we're going to produce more american made energy, oil, clean coal, natural gas. alone, those will create 600,000 new jobs in 10 years. wind, solar, biofuel. we have already required automobiles to double their mileage. that alone will save 1.7 trillion dollars at the pump a
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. -- of the particular course the storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurricane
and i built a solar car that we raced across the united states. this is not rocket science, folks. this industry has been around a long time. it just requires political leadership. political leadership that my opponent is not willing to exercise. >> the political leadership came from the president of the united states. we both agree coal must be part of america's energy future. it is low cost, it is much cleaner than it was 30 years ago, and i am and all the above energy kind of gal. the energy costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. currently, solar energy is four or five times that much. if coal is the fuel of the past, reasonably priced electric bills are a thing of the past. i'm going to fight for those jobs and i will fight for low- cost energy. >> ok. that concludes the first half of our debate. we will take a 60-90 second non- commercial break and we'll be right back with you. thank you. [applause] >> we will go ahead and get the second part of the debate started. as i mentioned, the situation will be reversed in terms of the questioning. the first part of the second half of t
compromise won't trust science, won't work at all. we're seeing that. so i believe there will be a change in our recent cross the aisle. i did before. we can do that. i come from a republican family. the problem is we have a very right-wing group in washington right now that will not compromise. >> moderator: mr. guinta, one minute. guinta: first, she blames the tea party. i'm undergoing different tv station she found herself agreeing with the tea party and says she agrees with many principles of the tea party, so you can't have it both ways. secondly, the freshman class was elected around the country because the congress who served in the spending and borrowing out of control and passing legislation that the country didn't want. the countries that enough in 2010. so here's always done in the house. firstly we did was cut her own budgets. the second day we did was vote to repeal the affordable carrots, something the country wanted us to do. the third thing was stop earmarks. the fourth thing we did was freeze congressional pay. and then went into the bipartisan work with more than dirty d
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
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to pay for my fees. i also come back and help out here. a little can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not go to university, but i would like to help them. i feel excited. >> i'm going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer.
to serve so that one man ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam burt ended up setting up his own nonprofit. serve with habitat for humanity. a youth hockey coach in football coach. it at the mission continues and did an in the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. it ended up becoming a biology teacher for part of her. and what happened was for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finding a way to continue to serve on their new frontline. and what we found ed the mission continues is that all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people are around the country. and i finished the book, i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. you don't -- your own life feels fill the possibility. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your ventures. the road before you is long. you will wind up steep hills and down to low valleys. there will be moments of spectacular beauty along the way and
. find a way to continue to serve so that josh ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam, who was hit by the mortar round set up his own nonprofit. julian served with habitat for humanity, sean became a youth hockey coach and football coach. ian smith did a fellowship at the police continues and then did an internship and the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. melissa steinman became a biology teacher, and for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finds a way to continue to serve on the new front line. and what we found at the mission continues, is all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people around the country. and i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. your own life feels filled with possibilities. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your adventure. the road before you is long. it will wind up steep hills and down into low valleys. moments of spectacular beauty
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
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